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.s. history that have transformed the laws of the country and illuminated protections afforded to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview, part of booktv's college series, was recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. it's about 20 minutes. >> host: university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of our nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment beg
with the a ministration. the pendant that was put into the law when there were set up which made them an independent voice cannot sell rights, it was really important. they should not try to be friendly with some particular administration. their job was to be a watchdog. a watchdog over with the demonstration was doing. and they learned that. and then when kennedy was assassinated and johnson was uprose civil-rights because of that the civil rights act of '64 and '65, actually enacted into law. >> of a point did you become aware in your life of the civil rights commission? >> i became aware of them when i was in the graduate program university. asked if i work on a project. >> sixty's, 70's. >> yes. i used some of the reports because the reports they did were very good reports. some of the historical research that i did. so i was very much aware of them. finally by the time the commission as to me since i've do legal and constitutional history file would read something of a history of abortion rights for them and how that all played out and what the history had been all the way back to england and so on.
an enormous amount of money as his law partner and kind of takes care of the widow and young girl and pays for them, says them up in a nice home. he becomes the godfather of the little girl, francis. they are very close. she calls them uncle cleve. he closer frankie. he pays to send her to college. but happens is francis is growing up and her relationship changes from uncle cleve to godfather to a romantic interest. cleveland started sending her letters. it's the full-court press on courting her. >> now joining us here on her booktv set is trained to. her most recent book is so spoke the earth -- "so spoke the earth". in january 2010, where were you? >> i was here in miami and the deeper market with my daughter when someone called me and said there had been an earthquake in haiti. of course so many lives were changed at a loss to family members and many friends in the country that something like 200,000 people. >> host: when did you get to haiti after the earthquake? >> guest: i had a little baby at the time, slated back until three weeks later to see some family and friends and how they w
law that eventually came apart in 1964. the student newspaper supported the marchers. we had some black students in chapel hill at that time and felt that if they couldn't eat in the same restaurants with all the rest of us, that budget right. and so all of these photographs were taken initially for either the student newspaper or for i served as a string err for some of the -- stringer for some of the local wire services and what not. today in publishing the book one of the purposes was to let some of today's generation who still live in chapel hill and are descendants from the people in photographs know and understand what their parents and grandparents did so that they can enjoy the same freedoms that in some manner they take for granted often today to be able to go into a lunch counter or wherever. >> host: so 1961-1964, and i'm guessing you can speak to the majority of these and you can recall the moment? we're looking at this one right here, group of folks in front of a merchant's association. >> guest: after having picketed for a number of months, they decided it was time t
that are not authorized by law. number six, congress routinely raise the social security trust fund to cover general revenue shortfalls. >> guest: if you look at the appropriation bills come which have not been on the last two years because of the political dynamic going on and you go when they were put in x amount of money and look at how many programs, it's over $350 billion now. programs that are funded that are not authorized by the congress. which tells you there's an imbalance in congress is heavily appropriate funds for a program we haven't said we should be spending money on any toes see you the power of the appropriations committees in the power of pork or benefit to the states. what's most important? is the most important to look at an oklahoma at the amount of money i can direct their? or is it more important to think of the long run, with the help of our country in the long run and how do we make this type decisions? politically puts you on the losing side of every argument, that you work hard to explain yourself. poster number seven, members of congress don't have the opportunity to rea
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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